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Local

St. Charles bike facility hosts fundraiser for nontraditional cyclists

ST. CHARLES – Stacee Seay provided words of encouragement to Ted Moss as he pushed himself to go faster on a handcycle.

"Go, Ted. Just a little more," Seay said.

The 64-year-old Moss, of Lake Forest, was participating in Monday's Reindeer Race indoor time trial at The Bike Rack Performance Center in St. Charles. Riders paid $25 in advance and $35 on the day of the event, with the proceeds going to Project Mobility: Cycles for Life, a nonprofit organization that offers recreational events using specialized bicycles for people with disabilities.

Moss has a spinal cord injury and can't walk. But he has found freedom through handcycling.

"We have to use our arms instead of our legs," he said. "It's great aerobic exercise. It keeps you in good shape."

Moss was proud of the fact that he ended up going 6.2 miles on the handcycle in a little more than 24 minutes. Fellow handcycle rider Eugene Alvarez, 42, of Chicago, who also has disabilities, was trying to beat that time.

"I'm feeling good," Alvarez said.

Hal Honeyman, one of the owners of The Bike Rack, founded Project Mobility. His interest in adaptive cycling was spurred on by his son, Jacob, who has cerebral palsy.

"Just because you have some injury, it doesn't mean you can't have a full, normal life," Honeyman said. "There is life beyond your injury. There is so much more you can do if you choose to."

His group also has teamed up with the Wounded Warrior Project over the years to help wounded veterans.

"We've tried to show them there is something more they can do," Honeyman said.

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