Digital Access

Digital Access
Access kcchronicle.com from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Want to make sure you receive the latest local news? We’ve got you covered! Get the best in local news, sports, community events, with focus on what’s coming up for the weekend. Weekly mail subscription offers

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, prep sports, weather, and more. Text alerts are a free service from Kane County Chronicle, but text rates may apply.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
Sign up for free email alerts. We'll deliver news & updates to your inbox.
The Holiday Gift Auction is Live! Click here and bid now on great local gifts!
Local

Fermilab to celebrate arrival of 50-foot-wide electromagnet

BATAVIA – Fermilab is inviting the public to a party July 26 to celebrate the safe arrival of a 50-foot-wide circular electromagnet.

For the past month, the electromagnet has been on a 3,200-mile journey between two U.S. Department of Energy national labs: Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York and Fermilab in Batavia. On July 26, that voyage is expected to conclude.

The magnet is the centerpiece of Fermilab’s new Muon g-2 experiment, which will study the properties of elusive subatomic particles called muons.

The ring was built at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s for a similar experiment, one which found hints of new physics beyond what scientists had observed.

Fermilab will conduct a similar experiment with the most powerful beam of muons in the world, an experiment that could open up new realms of scientific discovery.

“It’s been a very long journey, and it took a lot of work from dozens of people,” said Chris Polly, the project’s manager at Fermilab, in a news release. “Now that it’s almost here, the excitement is building. We’re eager to get the magnet here and start the experiment.”

On the afternoon of July 26, the ring will move those last few miles across the Fermilab site.

The public is invited, along with Fermilab scientists and employees, to come celebrate the ring’s arrival, starting at 5:30 p.m. at Wilson Hall. There will be hands-on activities for the whole family, and scientists on the Muon g-2 experiment will be on hand to answer questions.

When the ring arrives at Wilson Hall, the action will move outside. Attendees will be able to watch the ring roll past the reflecting pond in front of Wilson Hall, and they will have the opportunity to pose for a massive group photo with the magnet before it moves to its final destination.

More information is available at http://muon-g-2.fnal.gov/bigmove.

Loading more