Sound Off: Kindness from motorcyclists

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The following is what our readers sounded off about this week:

Kindness from motorcyclists
I'm calling about the motorcycles the other day. There must have been 10 miles of them. The article on Tuesday was excellent. I didn't know there were so many in the area who did such nice things. Thank you to them.

Oktoberfest fun
Here is a message for the person wanting to find Oktoberfest locally. There is a place. You have to drive a bit down North Avenue. It's at 729 North Ave., Glendale Heights. It's Schnitzel Platz restaurant, authentic German food and drink. Live music Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Closed Tuesday. Open for lunch and dinner. And also, there is a bit of Oktoberfest on radio Saturday and Sunday, 9 o'clock to 11 o'clock, 1080-AM on the dial. It has German music. And that is a touch of Oktoberfest on Saturday and Sunday.

Listening to constituents
I'm calling in response to the comment in Sound Off about how the servants of the American people don't pay attention to their constituents. As a member of the St. Charles Library Board, we are there to serve the public. Every board meeting has a time for public comments or statements by members of the community. If you have something to say or bring to the board's attention, citizens are always welcome to come and speak at our board meetings. I don't know what district this person is from, but the bottom line is if you want to be heard, you can always attend the meeting. But you have to understand that every individual's opinion is their own opinion. You might be for or against something, but that doesn't mean the whole community is for or against it. Library board members serve for no pay. They give their pay because of love for the community and love of the library, and they're doing their best to make the best decisions for all of the community and I, personally, am proud to serve.

One nation, under?
America, one nation under God. If we don't start practicing more of the golden rule and less of the rule of gold, we will become one nation, under.
Obamacare good? To a point
I'm responding to "Obamacare is good." It's good that the people who don't have health insurance pay their monthly premiums like we have for the past eight years. For the past eight years, we haven't had jobs here, moving to the Tri-Cities area. We still have kept our health insurance. How do we do it? Nobody gets Christmas gifts. Nobody gets birthday gifts. We have cut down on eating out, fun times and everything like that. Yes, it can be done. Yes, Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare is good, yes, but I doubt that the people who never had health insurance will pay these high premiums. We have $5,000 deductible for the both of us, each. We never need it. We're also on prescription pills that we are both on for life. We have to have that insurance, and our premiums are not that expensive. Obamacare is good to a point, but not for us who had health insurance all these years, plus our premiums have gone up.

Recipe for disaster
The chief executive of our nation refuses to compromise on issues. That leaves me no other choice than to believe he has assumed the role of a dictator. The speaker of the House is nothing but a political hack, who – if that isn't bad enough – has lost control of the situation. The American public, feeling it has nowhere to turn, is frightfully well armed because elected officials have for so long sold out to the NRA. Add the ingredients listed above, and you have the recipe for a revolution. Why wouldn't anybody believe it couldn't happen in this country?


Thank goodness for the Blue Goose
In a time where it seems small, independent businesses are closing, thank goodness for the Blue Goose Market. They have the best meat, bakery and deli departments in the valley. They also have a great floral department, which is a good thing because most of the floral shops in the local area have closed. I've shopped there for years and have rarely been disappointed. Just wanted to give a shout out.

The future of libraries
I read with great interest the article in the Oct. 2 edition regarding the Geneva library. Compared to surrounding communities (St. Charles, Batavia, even Plano), our facilities are lacking. We're way overdue for an upgrade, and it's been reported that previous studies have shown the current location to be impossible to retrofit to future needs. The way we use libraries has changed, and it's time we changed what we have. I do take exception to using the library for tutoring purposes. Although this may seem a legitimate use and is "educational," know that these tutors are business people and charge for their services. Libraries should not be used to provide free, public space for those engaged in commercial activities. These tutors and their students often take up the entire reading area on the first floor and are noisy. I'd be interested in knowing if other libraries allow this.

What's affordable?
The delinquent tax list came out, and Batavia has a substantial amount of tax delinquencies. And then also, it was indicated that affordable housing has declined in Batavia. But one of the definitions of affordable housing is housing that costs 30 percent or less of income. And they say the majority of affordable housing already is occupied by owners, but they failed to mention that the 30 percent of income that is reported should be – but probably isn't – the taxes you have to pay. Housing in Batavia has become unaffordable, even for people who already live in what used to be affordable houses, simply because the taxes have gone through the roof. When you're looking for a house that was affordable when you bought it 25 or 30 years ago and you look at what you're paying today in taxes, you're paying almost $700 a month in real estate taxes. Then you add in the increases in utilities and storm water, you add up those increases, and you see the municipal taxes added to your utilities, and you can see why there is no affordable housing anywhere in Illinois, especially in Batavia, Geneva, St. Charles and Aurora.

• You can sound off, as well, by calling our Sound Off line at 630-845-5240 or by sending an e-mail to soundoff@kcchronicle.com. Calls must be limited to 1 minute or less.

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