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Health

Mouth and body connections with Murphy Dentistry in Batavia

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Did you know your oral health can be an indicator of your overall health?

As a matter of fact, according to WebMD, your mouth is the gateway to your body.

Bacteria that builds up on teeth make gums prone to infection and when the immune systems attack the infection, leading to inflammation of the gums. The inflammation continues unless the infection is brought under control and, over time, the inflammation and chemicals it releases can lead to severe gum disease. Inflammation can also cause problems in the rest of the body, according to WebMD.

Batavia dentist Ronald Murphy advised that signs of diabetes, heart disease/coronary artery disease and pancreatic cancer may all be detected in the mouth.

“The warning signs are different, but a dentist can detect plaque build-up in the arteries in the neck, which is a warning sign of a possible stroke,” Murphy said. His practice is located at 1605 W. Wilson St., Suite 114. “Warning signs are different for everyone, but in general, if a mouth is dirty or not responding to treatment, then I would want to see what else is going on.”

According to WebMD, the relationship between diabetes and periodontitis may be the strongest of the mouth and body connections. Inflammation that starts in the mouth seems to weaken the body’s ability to control blood sugar.

WebMD also advises that there is a clear connection between gum disease and heart disease. Though the reasons are not completely understood, the theory is that inflammation in the mouth causes inflammation in the blood vessels, which can increase the risk of heart attack.

Murphy advised that he reviews the health history of his patients at each hygiene visit.

“If and when I see signs of a problem, then I refer them to the correct person for a follow up,” he said.

 www.murphydentistry.com | 630.879.7642 |  1605 W. Wilson St., Suite 114, Batavia, IL 

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