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Editorials

Our View: Setting your student up for success this school year

School is fundamental for the rest of a student’s life. It’s the figurative brick and mortar that will support all of their endeavors, but it isn’t the sole foundation; what students don’t learn at school they learn from their family.

A student’s years spent in elementary through high school are not only important if they want to go to college, the military or a trade school, but they are a must to be a well-rounded person with an exposure to different ideas, views and concepts.

That’s the exact reason why making sure everything goes smoothly at school for students is so important. It’s not only the teachers and school administrators at Kaneland School District 302, Geneva School District 304, Batavia School District 101 or St. Charles School District 303 that are responsible for a child’s scholastic success; the parents have as much lay to that claim as any educator.

The foundation has to be set at home to enable a school to nurture a child’s curiosity and intellect. The first thing that comes to mind is to make sure the child shows up and does the work each and every day. Homework may seem pointless after a child has sat in a desk for about seven hours a day, but the point of it is to reinforce what the child knows so that it’s not just in the short-term memory, but for the long term and the rest of the student’s life. School isn’t about the next test; it’s about the future beyond that.

If students feel the classroom doldrums pressing upon them, their parents should speak to them. Try to speak to your child openly and find out what the issue is and why the student isn’t working toward his or her full potential. The student could be distracted or having trouble with the material or any other problem associated with growing up that won’t be resolved unless the parent takes the time to speak to the student and find out.  

Brian Faulkner, principal at Kaneland Harter Middle School, said the more we can communicate with students, the better.

“The more we can share with each other, the more we can speak the same language of what we can do together to support our kids,” Faulkner said. “It’s only going to help our kids.”

It’s also important to instill a sense of ownership of the school into the child. School isn’t something that happens to students; it’s something students take part in and make their own. A great way to get students more active is to involve them in clubs and give them something to care about in addition to grades or standardized test performances.

The best way for a student to be active is to see their parent leading by example. So go ahead and get involved with the school as much as you’d like to see your child be.

“Kids always seem to do real well imitating us,” Faulkner said. “I know my girls, and whatever my wife and I model is what they end up doing.”

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