Digital Access

Digital Access
Access kcchronicle.com from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Want to make sure you receive the latest local news? We’ve got you covered! Get the best in local news, sports, community events, with focus on what’s coming up for the weekend. Weekly mail subscription offers

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, prep sports, weather, and more. Text alerts are a free service from Kane County Chronicle, but text rates may apply.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
Sign up for free email alerts. We'll deliver news & updates to your inbox.
Local

Our View: Teens must keep their eyes on the road

It seems that in the last few months there has been an uptick in the number of serious – and even fatal – crashes in Kane County.

A two-car crash in St. Charles on Oct. 11 sent three people to the hospital in serious condition. A 19-year-old Batavia resident was cited for improper lane usage in that crash; police said the driver fell asleep behind the wheel.

In addition, there was an Oct. 6 accident near St. Charles, where 19-year-old Nicholas Hanson of Geneva died. The 19-year-old Geneva driver in that crash was charged with reckless homicide, aggravated DUI, driving in the wrong lane and driving too fast for conditions.

And a car-versus-motorcycle accident in St. Charles occurred Sept. 2, where Richard Klein, 64, of West Chicago, died after colliding with a Dodge Avenger driven by a 17-year-old who was cited for failure to yield while turning left.

These crashes have something in common – young drivers.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board, car accidents are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States, with eight teenagers dying as a result every day.

Of course, it's not always a teenager who is hurt or dies in a crash where a young driver is involved.

Dmv.org offers tips on how teens can stay safe – and keep others safe – while behind the wheel. These should be obvious, as they’ve been repeated time and time again, but they need to be said at least once more: Keep cellphones off, and don’t text while driving.

Overall, just be responsible when behind the wheel.

The time that drivers have their eyes on a phone, they aren’t looking at the road. In the 4.6 seconds it takes to send an average text, a car can drive the length of a football field, according to dmv.org.

Just being on the phone in the car impairs a driver as much as driving drunk – even a hands-free phone – according to dmv.org.

Parents, speak to your children about safe driving and keeping their eyes on the road. It may just save their lives. Or the lives of others.

Loading more