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Crime & Courts

License revocation upheld for St. Charles massage business

ST. CHARLES Mayor Raymond Rogina, acting as liquor control commissioner for St. Charles, enforced local massage ordinances and upheld the revocation of the license of Shangri-La Massage & Spa, 2015 Dean St., Suite 7A, St. Charles, prompted after an employee was cited Jan. 11, 2017, for misdemeanor prostitution, according to a city of St. Charles news release.

Shangri-La also must pay $2,990.20 in court costs, the release stated. The St. Charles Liquor Control Commission addresses alcohol, tobacco and massage license issues.

The licensee came before the St. Charles Liquor Commission on Nov. 13, after appealing the original Feb. 6 license revocation, the release stated.

On Nov. 27, Rogina issued his findings and decision from the November hearing, once again finding the licensee committed seven violations of the Massage Establishment Code. Five violations pertained to prostitution, solicitation to commit prostitution or other acts of a sexual nature; two pertained to supervision, the release stated.

The licensee took part in a mitigation hearing Dec. 18. After review of the hearing transcript, Rogina determined that each alleged violation of the Massage Establishment Code was violated by a preponderance of evidence, the release stated.

Citing case law, Rogina stated in the release: “The absence of prior violations or evidence that a licensee knew of its employee’s prohibited conduct does not render a decision to revoke a massage establishment license an abuse of discretion.”

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