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American Science & Surplus employee Billy Jarrett shows Ian Burmester, 10, of St. Charles, the Celestron LCD microscope during the store’s “Science Night” event Friday as part of its 75th anniversary celebration.
Pat Meyer, the new owner of American Science & Surplus, which has a location in Geneva, said he’s seeking to expand the store’s Science Nights with more involvement in the community.
“We’re looking to involve the schools more because of our science and education background,” Meyer said.
Science Nights includes star parties where astronomers set up telescopes to observe the sky, microscopes and other science stations.
“It’s all free and the kids enjoy it,” Meyer said.
American Science & Surplus employee Billy Jarrett shows Ian Burmester, 10, of St. Charles, the Celestron LCD microscope during the store’s “Science Night” event Friday as part of its 75th anniversary celebration. Pat Meyer, the new owner of American Science & Surplus, which has a location in Geneva, said he’s seeking to expand the store’s Science Nights with more involvement in the community. “We’re looking to involve the schools more because of our science and education background,” Meyer said. Science Nights includes star parties where astronomers set up telescopes to observe the sky, microscopes and other science stations. “It’s all free and the kids enjoy it,” Meyer said.
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