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What to know when you experience numbness and tingling

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Experiencing “pins and needles” is an unpleasant sensation.

The common reason to experience numbness or tingling is a problem with nerve function, either because the nerve itself is injured, or something is pressing on the nerve. In other instances, there is an imbalance in the body’s chemistry that interferes with nerve function.

If you cross your legs too long or fall asleep with your arm above your head, the numbness or tingling will go away shortly after the pressure is removed from the nerve.

According to Harvard Health, most causes are not dangerous, but if you experience muscle weakness or paralysis, this should be treated as an emergency.

You may experience tingling in the hands or feet – or both – and this can be episodic or chronic. Other symptoms may include pain, itching or numbness. In some cases, this can be a sign of nerve damage caused from a traumatic injury, repetitive stress injuries, bacterial or viral infections or diseases such as diabetes.

Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy, accounting for about 30 percent of cases according to WebMD. In diabetic neuropathy, tingling and other symptoms first develop in both feet and go up the legs following by tingling and other symptoms that affect both hands and move up the arms. In many cases, these symptoms are the first signs of diabetes.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is an example of a nerve entrapment syndrome. Vitamin deficiencies such as too much B6 can also cause tingling in the hands and feet. Alcoholics are also more likely to have nerve damage.

If you experience tingling in your hands and feet, talk to your doctor. Successful treatment depends on the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause of the tingling, however according to WebMD, as long as the peripheral nerve cells have not been killed, they have the ability to regenerate.

Pure Health Physical Medicine: 2116 W. Galena Blvd., Suite 112, Aurora, IL 60560: 630.897.1895 : www.getpurehealthnow.com